FAQ: How To Measure Bicycle Chain Length?

How do you measure chain size?

To measure the chain size, if you have just the sprocket, use calipers to measure between the teeth. Measure from center to center of where the chain roller would set between the teeth that will give you the pitch. Once you know the pitch you can determine what chain size you would need.

What size is standard bicycle chain?

Chains come in 3⁄32 in (2.4 mm), 1⁄8 in (3.2 mm), 5⁄32 in (4.0 mm), or 3⁄16 in (4.8 mm) roller widths, the internal width between the inner plates. 1⁄8 in (3.2 mm) chains are typically used on bikes with a single rear sprocket: those with coaster brakes, hub gears, fixed gears such as track bicycles, or BMX bikes.

How do I know my roller chain size?

Roller Chain Identification Most roller chain has the size stamped right into the side plates. You may see something like “40”, “C2080H” or “10B” stamped in, which the industry number that represents the chain size. Old chains will most likely need to be cleaned in order to see the size.

Are all bicycle chains the same size?

Are all bicycle chains the same size? No, all bicycle chains are not the same size. Size varies on the bike’s numbers of sprockets, speeds, the distance between the front chainring and rear cogs, and the number of teeth on them.

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How often should I change my bike chain?

The 2,000-Mile Rule. To avoid this accelerated wear of your cassette and chainrings, a general rule of thumb is to replace your bike’s chain every 2,000 miles. Mind you, this is just a starting point. No two chains will wear at exactly the same rate because no two riders treat their chains the same. 4

Are 6 7 8 speed chains the same?

5, 6, 7 and 8 speed chains Shimano, SRAM and Campagnolo all use the same chain with 8 speeds. Chain for 7 speeds is a bit wider – 7.3 mm, while a 6 speed one is substantially wider – 7.8 mm.

How tight should a single speed bike chain be?

Chain Tension There should be approximately one half inch of movement in the chain up and down at a point half way between the front and rear sprockets. To change the tension loosen one of the axle-nuts and move the wheel forward or backward slightly and snug it up again.

How do I know what type of chain I need?

However you can act earlier by using a chain measuring device to determine if your chain is beginning to wear – catch it quickly and you only need a new chain. An alternative, but less accurate, method is to measure the length of 12 links, which on a new chain should be exactly 12”.

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